Which Flowers to Give?

Which flowers to give - Cottonbuds Florists
Which flowers to give – Cottonbuds Florists

Did you know that certain flowers are associated with months of the year, for example.  if someone’s birthday is in July, their birthday flower is the Airy and Graceful Larkspur which symbolises Lightness and Humour.  To learn more about which flower is associated with each month of the year, take a look at this article by Cottonbuds, Northampton Florists. You can buy flowers in Northampton from Cottonbuds Florists.

 

A Poinsettia is not just for Christmas!

Year round Poinsettia - Cottonbuds Florists
Year round Poinsettia – Cottonbuds Florists

A poinsettia plant is a popular Christmas gift due to it being a winter blooming plant. But there’s no reason to get rid of it after Christmas. With the correct care, you can keep it all year round.

During the Christmas period, keep it close to a window, allowing it to get as much winter sun as possible, and make sure the temperature doesn’t drop below around 19-20 c. The plant should be watered thoroughly when it feels dry and should be sprayed with a water mist daily.

What about through the rest of the year?

Up until the end of March, mist it and treat just as you did over Christmas

By the time you get into April, reduce the amount of watering, allowing it to get a little drier and after a few weeks, move it to a cooler spot in the home

In May time, trim the plant back to less than 6inches above the soil level and re-pot it into a slightly larger container, adding some slow release fertiliser and place it back in a warmer sunnier spot, misting it daily.

Come June, you can move your poinsettia outside into a sunny location and after a month or so, trim back the stems by a couple of centimetres to encourage it to become bushy

For late summer ensure it is regularly watered and misted. Bring it back inside come October.

To encourage the development of buds, move the plant to a totally dark area from early evening until morning, move it back to a sunny spot during the day

By November, you can stop the overnight darkness treatment and leave it in a warm sunny spot in the house.

Continue watering and misting and your Poinsettia should bloom again for Christmas

Article by Northampton Florists Cottonbuds.

Floral Table Runner

Floral runner by Carolanne Flower
Floral runner by Carolanne Flower

It’s not too difficult to create a really beautiful table runner using beautiful autumn leaves, and it will make a great centrepiece and talking point for your next dinner party.

Start off by taking a woodland walk and collecting fallen leaves, trying to pick reasonably fresh ones that will be easier to work with. If you want to produce, say, a four foot runner, you are going to need around 120 separate leaves, so try to collect colours that will work well together.

Once you get the leaves home, give them a wipe over with a damp cloth to remove any marks, pinch or cut off any residual stalks, and leave them to dry off.

Next, you’ll want to flatten the leaves , which is best done by placing them between the page of some heavy books, probably no more than a half dozen per page every 50-60 pages. So you’ll need a few books. Leave them to flatten out for 3 or 4 days.

Meanwhile, cut a piece of Hessian, about 4 to 6 inches wide and of the desired length. This will be used to provide a backing for the runner.

When flattened, remove the leaves and use a little craft glue on the back of each leave and position them on the hessian, overlapping each other. If you want your runner a little wider, you can glue leaves on to other leaves at the edges to increase the width.

When positioning the leaves, try to align them so that the leaves all point outwards as this will produce a nicer effect.

Leave it a few hours to fully dry, and it’s ready for use. If you plan to re-use it, try to store it as flat as possible.

Article from Leading Milton Keynes Florists, Carolanne Flowers

Muted Wedding Flowers

We have a wedding coming up soon in our household so there has been a great deal of talk about wedding flowers, how many, what types and what colours. We had a long discussion with our local flower shop,  Cottonbuds Florists in Northampton, and they told us that here was a real trend towards soft colours in flower bouquets for the big day.

They were kind enough to show us images of a whole range of flowers they’ve arranged for recent weddings (the slideshow above shows them in all their glory) and you can see just how beautiful they look with flowers of all types in muted colours such as Lavender, Peach, Rose, Cream and Mocha. The dreamy soft colours work beautifully against the dark green of the stems and leaves.

I guess they won’t be everyone’s choice, but we love them. Perhaps they’ll give you some inspiration if you have a wedding in the family

 

Cut flowers in the home

Keeping cut flowers fresh from Carolanne Flowers
Keeping cut flowers fresh from Carolanne Flowers

Few things are nicer than the look and  aroma of freshly cut flowers in the home. Most florists can offer a great selection of blooms to choose from along with bouquets freshly arranged to a set pattern. Flowers are very much back in fashion these days , and not just as a last minute gift for granny. Your local florist can provide you with a wide range of choice form most occasions including Wedding Flowers, Funeral Tributes, Birthday Gifts, New Baby and of course Valentines, when you’ll need Roses for a loved one. But don’t forget to treat yourself to a regular bunch of flowers to brighten up your own home.

Most good florists will make up a fresh bouquet to order and deliver it locally the next day with a message of your choice

Finally, here’s a tip for keeping your flowers fresh, provided to us by Carolanne Flowers of Milton Keynes. Before you put flowers in a vase, sterilize it with a little bleach to kill bacteria that would otherwise start to spoil the flowers, and when you see any signs of wilting, add some fizzy drink, such as lemonade to the vase. The sugar will perk up the flowers and give them a fresh lease of life.